Hello There, Guest! Login Register
Index    |     Search    |     Members    |     Help

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
physician oaths
#1
Anyone interested in Physician oaths might check out http://www.pneuro.com/publications/oaths...n's%20Oath
This is a catalog of various Physician's oaths that exist.
Most of what I read here seems to conflict a bit with Independant Medical Examiners and the like.
 
Reply
#2
My Opinion is, I think you are mis-understanding the meaning of what (is a IME) for there ia really only one Oath. When a person goes to an (IME) that person is not a patient of such (IME), the person is there, only for a Medical Opinion.

At the time of being admitted as a member of the medical profession:

I solemnly pledge myself to consecrate my life to the service of humanity;
I will give to my teachers the respect and gratitude which is their due;
I will practice my profession with conscience and dignity; the health of my patient will be my first consideration;
I will maintain by all the means in my power, the honor and the noble traditions of the medical profession; my colleagues will be my brothers;
I will not permit considerations of religion, nationality, race, party politics or social standing to intervene between my duty and my patient;
I will maintain the utmost respect for human life from the time of conception, even under threat, I will not use my medical knowledge contrary to the laws of humanity;
I make these promises solemnly, freely and upon my honor.
Reply's are intended solely for informational purposes. They are based on personal opinions, experience, or research and are "not to be taken as fact or legal advice", otherwise, always consult an attorney or a doctor.
 
Reply
#3
I think the vast majority of physicians, at least upon entering the profession, do put the needs of their patients first. However, doctors that accept workers comp patients have so much red tape in the crazy system and so many regulations placed upon them. They no longer have the control of their patient's medical care. Once they make a decision, any decision, that decision has to be run through all the Cost Containment Organizations that the I/C employs. The vast majority of medical decisions are made by Claims Adjusters and/or Utilization Review. If the doctors decision involves a lot of money, then the I/C will involve higher Cost Containment Organizations such as Disability Management and will assign a NCM to get involved with the patient and the doctor; all in order to cut costs.

Then again, you have the physicians who are bought and paid for by the I/C. Frontline WC docs are a good example. They provide initial medical, find little wrong with you, then release you back to work. The big push now is on how quick the patient Returns to Work, regardless if they are medically ready or not. Big incentives are paid to Employers who have an active RTW program.

The goal is to return the patient to work, but should not be the first consideration in workers comp, but unfortunately due to cost containment, it is. Humanity plays little part in the medical care provided by the I/C, and it's the claims adjuster's job to see that the costs are kept to a minimum. Most don't care about the Injured Workers cases they handle, but some do.

Have you ever noticed that most IME's are very old? IMHO, the majority of IME's come out of their retirement to supplement their income. If they want to keep that money coming in, they have to do what their employer asks of them.

It's a vicious circle of politics and corruption with money as the goal. It's no wonder that so many of the "good" physicians will not get involved with workers comp.
Let Go, and Let God......
 
Reply
#4
An article I read said that there was no one oath that is in standard use in medical schools. Some use the oath of Hippocrates, and some allow graduating students to write their own oaths. The common thread seems to be that a doctor will not use his medical knowledge the way that so many IME doctors do. It would be fun to see an attorney ask about the oath in a depo or in court.
 
Reply
#5
My Opinion again; Is that I would think such article is wrong, and an opinion of the writter. For if it were so, then say for (Example) 100 Medical Students going to take such Oaths, would be standing for hours on end till each one was read, repeated, wrote, and signed. I find that a little hard to think of taking place.
Reply's are intended solely for informational purposes. They are based on personal opinions, experience, or research and are "not to be taken as fact or legal advice", otherwise, always consult an attorney or a doctor.
 
Reply
#6
When I posted my original message, it was with the intention that anyone who wanted to, could see for themselves that there are guiding principles in the practice of medicine that have existed as long as medicine itself.
It is often hard to reconcile those principles with the behavior of some of the insurance examiners who I have personally run across or read about in the posts on this site. It was my hope that other i/w's would find some comfort in the realization that physicians who would deliberately increase the suffering of a human being in exchange for financial gain are operating outside of those noble principles. I've seen it written many times that the "judges" know this and decide accordingly, but if this is true, why let an injured worker go through this at all. I don't mean to sound naive, as I am aware that the corporations are entitled to their due process rights, but I seriously question whether more could be done by the "judges" and the medical community to address what is at times so obviously nonsense.
My concern is that the practice is increasing (IME mills are popping up everywhere) instead of decreasing.
I would see the day when an i/w would question in advance why an insurer chose a particular doctor to perform an IME, especially when they are often forced to travel past the offices of many equally qualified physicians who are not chosen. Palm trees and parakeets just went through a horrible experience, and I woulder if we collectively could do more to help future victims. I would call the medical community, the attorneys, and the judiciary to a higher standard.
 
Reply
#7
Bad Boy Bad Boy Wrote:My Opinion is, I think you are mis-understanding the meaning of what (is a IME) for there ia really only one Oath. When a person goes to an (IME) that person is not a patient of such (IME), the person is there, only for a Medical Opinion.

At the time of being admitted as a member of the medical profession:

I solemnly pledge myself to consecrate my life to the service of humanity;
I will give to my teachers the respect and gratitude which is their due;
I will practice my profession with conscience and dignity; the health of my patient will be my first consideration;
I will maintain by all the means in my power, the honor and the noble traditions of the medical profession; my colleagues will be my brothers;
I will not permit considerations of religion, nationality, race, party politics or social standing to intervene between my duty and my patient;
I will maintain the utmost respect for human life from the time of conception, even under threat, I will not use my medical knowledge contrary to the laws of humanity;
I make these promises solemnly, freely and upon my honor.

I have an IME coming up 1/29/08 and perhaps I should copy this oath and hand it to the DR. when I go in. If nothing else maybe it will remind him of the reason he bacame an MD.
GOD BLESS OUR COUNTRY AND OUR PRESIDENT!
 
Reply
#8
And I fully understand your cause.

But please understand, a person is not the Patient of an (IME Doctor) but a paitent of another Doctor they have been being seen by.

Being said, as you have read in the Oath, it will state [their Patient;]

In general an IME doesn't even treat a person, unless the person for some strange reason allows it.
Reply's are intended solely for informational purposes. They are based on personal opinions, experience, or research and are "not to be taken as fact or legal advice", otherwise, always consult an attorney or a doctor.
 
Reply
#9
I was thinking of the part that states I will maintain by all the means in my power, the honor and the noble traditions of the medical profession. I will maintain the utmost respect for human life from the time of conception, even under threat.
GOD BLESS OUR COUNTRY AND OUR PRESIDENT!
 
Reply
#10
Backache,
You still have time to question why a particular physician was chosen to perform your IME. The insurer is entitled to another opinion certainly, but you are within your rights to question the reason for his selection, especially if there is an equally qualified examiner closer to your home.
There is a letter on how to proceed (or how to ask your lawyer to proceed )on one of my previous posts. I strongly encourage you to take full advantage of your rights. Do not go blindly and hope for the best. I made this mistake and drove 50 miles to see an "M.D." who was in fact, not an "M.D." at all, and was examined before I realized it. In fairness, I also had an IME that was helpful to my case.
My thinking is that you should know who your going to, what their qualifications are, how much work they do for insurers, etc. so if and when you do go, you know exactly what to expect. Forewarned is forearmed.
 
Reply
  


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  IME vs Treating physician what now? Stormy 14 18,750 01-13-2013, 07:05 AM
Last Post: Stormy
  Physician order for a bed st. clare 15 16,363 09-21-2009, 05:04 PM
Last Post: chrischris
  physician choice Pam 14 8,890 02-09-2008, 06:09 AM
Last Post: nurse83
  Attending physician report collateraldamage5591 8 6,016 11-06-2007, 10:08 AM
Last Post: collateraldamage5591
  Finding a physician Diedre Costic 6 5,107 11-02-2007, 10:54 PM
Last Post: Diedre Costic
  Impartial physician BigL 4 5,044 06-21-2007, 01:52 PM
Last Post: Still in Limbo

Forum Jump:


Browsing: 1 Guest(s)