Hello There, Guest! Login Register
Index    |     Search    |     Members    |     Help

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
What is the difference?
#1
Can anyone tell me what is the difference between a Neuropsych and Psych exam?
 
Reply
#2
Neuropsychological testing (NPT) medically necessary when provided to aid in the assessment of cognitive impairment due to medical or psychiatric conditions. Examples of situations for which NPT may be medically necessary include, but are not limited to:

Assessment of neurocognitive abilities following traumatic brain injury, stroke, or neurosurgery or relating to a medical diagnosis, such as epilepsy, hydrocephalus or AIDS.
Assessment of neurocognitive functions to assist in the development of rehabilitation and/or management strategies for persons with diagnosed neurological disorders.
Differential diagnosis between psychogenic and neurogenic syndromes.
Monitoring of the progression of cognitive impairment secondary to neurological disorders.

Psychological testing (PT) medically necessary when needed to enhance psychiatric or psychotherapeutic treatment outcomes after a detailed diagnostic evaluation if:

Testing is needed to aid in the differential diagnosis of behavioral or psychiatric conditions when the member's history and symptomatology are not readily attributable to a particular psychiatric diagnosis and the questions to be answered by testing could not be resolved by a psychiatric/diagnostic interview, observation in therapy, or an assessment for level of care at a mental health or substance abuse facility; or
Testing is needed to develop treatment recommendations after the member has been tried on various medications and/or psychotherapy, has not progressed in treatment, and continues to be symptomatic.

http://www.aetna.com/cpb/medical/data/100_199/0158.html
Reply's are intended solely for informational purposes. They are based on personal opinions, experience, or research and are "not to be taken as fact or legal advice", otherwise, always consult an attorney or a doctor.
 
Reply
#3
BooBoosNeck Wrote:Can anyone tell me what is the difference between a Neuropsych and Psych exam?

probably very little.
a neuro would likely focus on organic diagnosis and testing while a psych would likely target emotional, mental, behavioral dysfunction.
Reminder :
........Each state has their own comp system; POST YOUR STATE to get accurate information. Use the search feature to find information from similar questions.
THANKS FOR POSTING.
 
Reply
#4
1171 Wrote:
BooBoosNeck Wrote:Can anyone tell me what is the difference between a Neuropsych and Psych exam?

probably very little.
a neuro would likely focus on organic diagnosis and testing while a psych would likely target emotional, mental, behavioral dysfunction.

Thanks to you both. I appreciate all of your help!
 
Reply
#5
BooBoo, the topic was discussed pretty thoroughly in this past thread. Good luck to you! Tongue http://www.workerscompensation.com/forum...p?tid=8019
Let Go, and Let God......
 
Reply
#6
Different areas of interest and very different training so the battery of tests each would administer will differ as well. The neuropsych is looking for evidence of an organic basis for behaviors while the psych is looking at non-organic, "functional" behaviors or illness.

I'm sure that clears it up for you, no ?
 
Reply
  


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  "admitted" body part vs. "accepted"; What's the difference? Seeking Help 3 2,570 02-04-2018, 11:06 PM
Last Post: goingback
  Difference between Workers comp and ADA FMP 11 10,848 01-12-2014, 05:47 PM
Last Post: jayne
Shy NY, any difference in CRPS/neuropathy? sonny1 1 10,306 02-19-2011, 09:09 PM
Last Post: UndercovrAngel
  the difference rhonda53 1 1,985 07-22-2009, 10:35 PM
Last Post: AQA
  Is there really a difference.............. chrischris 10 4,274 12-04-2007, 03:44 AM
Last Post: chrischris
  Difference in doctors offices WCisBS 7 4,142 10-21-2007, 05:56 AM
Last Post: Pooh

Forum Jump:


Browsing: 1 Guest(s)