Home | Solutions | News, Blogs & Events | State Info | Kids' Chance



Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Questions
#1

Hi, State of Pennsylvania here.

My question is. I am planning on resigning from my current job this week, and have accepted a position at a new company. I am currently on workers compensation through the 19th which is when my resignation date is. I am okay to do this?

Then if my doctor says you know we don't want you going back to work on full duty, and just light duty....am I am able to go back to work at my new job full duty? Or do I still have the follow the doctors orders? I wonder because its a new job.
Reply
#2

yes, you can ignore your doctor's work restrictions. but, of course, you cannot accept disability payments while you are working and any payments will stop.
always advise the doctor and the carrier of your work status.

Reminder :
........Each state has their own comp system; POST YOUR STATE to get accurate information. Use the search feature to find information from similar questions.
THANKS FOR POSTING.
Reply
#3

Resignation is often a really bad idea. If you are unable to do the new job, your time of injury employer can argue that but for your resignation they would have had work available within your restrictions which could prevent you from receiving wage loss benefits. Furthermore, even if you are taken out of work completely in the future for your injury, your old employer will be able to argue that something must have happened at the new employer which would delay or even prevent reinstatement of wage loss benefits.

As I would tell you if you were a client, you can't live your life based upon your workers' compensation claim, but you should really think this through before taking actions that could seriously damage you in the future. I would suggest that if you have not already resigned you at least talk to a local workers' compensation lawyer before you resign.

Timothy D. Belt
DISCLAIMER: This post is intended as general information applicable only to the state of Pennsylvania. The answer given is based only on the facts provided. This post is not intended to create an attorney client relationship, or to provide any specific guarantee of confidentiality.
Reply
#4

(05-14-2017, 10:31 AM)Timothy Belt Wrote:  Resignation is often a really bad idea. If you are unable to do the new job, your time of injury employer can argue that but for your resignation they would have had work available within your restrictions which could prevent you from receiving wage loss benefits. Furthermore, even if you are taken out of work completely in the future for your injury, your old employer will be able to argue that something must have happened at the new employer which would delay or even prevent reinstatement of wage loss benefits.

As I would tell you if you were a client, you can't live your life based upon your workers' compensation claim, but you should really think this through before taking actions that could seriously damage you in the future. I would suggest that if you have not already resigned you at least talk to a local workers' compensation lawyer before you resign.

I see what you are saying. I understand that I would not be getting wages anymore and that does not matter to me. I am doing better and have been doing better and found a new job while on leave.

Do you think its safe to leave the current job and pursue the new job? I did call the state and they said they would still have to pay for therapies and stuff. Am I able to ignore those doctors restriction?
Reply
#5

Changing jobs does not affect medical benefits directly. I say directly because if you have an increase in symptoms at the new job the carrier is going to challenge the causal connection of ongoing treatment to the original work injury.

As to the restrictions, they are there for a reason. If you want to risk further injury, that is your choice. You are free to ignore anyone's opinion including the restrictions from your doctor, but the result of ignoring good advise is rarely a good outcome.

Timothy D. Belt
DISCLAIMER: This post is intended as general information applicable only to the state of Pennsylvania. The answer given is based only on the facts provided. This post is not intended to create an attorney client relationship, or to provide any specific guarantee of confidentiality.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)