Hello There, Guest! Login Register
Index    |     Search    |     Members    |     Help

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
SCS
#1
Hey guys I have not logged in and posted lately, but I still come in and read.   8 years ago I had my spinal cord stimulator implanted in my right hip and wired up my spine. Guys after 8 years it has come to it's end of life.
All papers with it says the life is 5 years so I did get an extra 3 out of it.  Tomorrow I have an appointment with the surgeon who did the implant for me to see about surgery and getting it removed and I guess another one implanted.  I am sure they can not and will not remove the wire and paddle that is up my spine, because of all the tissue that has grown around and over it.  When it was implanted I have the latest and greatest of the time.  The latest and greatest of the time now allows you to have an MRI, I thinks is great. I have been asked to have MRI's in the past 8 years but have to tell them no because of the stimulator. So being able to have one would be a big deal  today. So I will head to the Dr. tomorrow not expecting any change other than a new battery being put into my hip....Will let people know how this goes as there is others on there who have stimulators but as I remember they had theirs implanted some time after I had mine implanted.
Toot a Loo
Cervical Fusion 2003, c5-c6. Herniated and damaged Disc L1- L4-L5 S1. Lumbar Spinal Cord stimulator implant 09-2008. Cervical ACDF revision with hardware c4-c5-c6-c7 Sept 2009.
SSDI approved 3-2010. NOW OFFICIALY RETIRED
 
Reply
#2
Good morning I had my appointment with the surgeon. It went well.  He took 8 to 10 ex rays of the scs and the leads going up my spine. Everything he said looks good. Just time to remove and replace it.  Before we do replace it he wants another  appointment with me and the Medtronic rep. with us.  He will not be removing the leads going up my spine only remove what he calls the battery in my hip.  He has removed the leads on patients before but he does not like to.  The reason he wants to have an appointment with the Medtronic rep. is because the battery is new technology and is different from what I have in my body.  He needs to see if the new will work with the current leads up my spine.  Did not say what we would do if the new does not work for me. Surgery should only take 30 minutes. Wanted to know if I wanted to stay awake during surgery or put to sleep. I told him if he was going to cut me that he would have to put me to sleep.  Of course we now have to wait until he gets approval from workers comp.  Now I wait for a call from his office when he gets that approval.  That's is where we are at.
Cervical Fusion 2003, c5-c6. Herniated and damaged Disc L1- L4-L5 S1. Lumbar Spinal Cord stimulator implant 09-2008. Cervical ACDF revision with hardware c4-c5-c6-c7 Sept 2009.
SSDI approved 3-2010. NOW OFFICIALY RETIRED
 
Reply
#3
Sounds like this will be a regular life time process.
Hopefully technology will continue to progress in this area.
Signature/Reminder :
........Each state has their own comp system; POST YOUR STATE to get accurate information.........
 
Reply
#4
(10-19-2016, 06:52 AM)Cervical_Fusion Wrote: Good morning I had my appointment with the surgeon. It went well.  He took 8 to 10 ex rays of the scs and the leads going up my spine. Everything he said looks good. Just time to remove and replace it.  Before we do replace it he wants another  appointment with me and the Medtronic rep. with us.  He will not be removing the leads going up my spine only remove what he calls the battery in my hip.  He has removed the leads on patients before but he does not like to.  The reason he wants to have an appointment with the Medtronic rep. is because the battery is new technology and is different from what I have in my body.  He needs to see if the new will work with the current leads up my spine.  Did not say what we would do if the new does not work for me. Surgery should only take 30 minutes. Wanted to know if I wanted to stay awake during surgery or put to sleep. I told him if he was going to cut me that he would have to put me to sleep.  Of course we now have to wait until he gets approval from workers comp.  Now I wait for a call from his office when he gets that approval.  That's is where we are at.
Helping out some patients both on this site and friends, I highly recommend asking the Medtronc rep for the model number of the implant he wants to use (unless he is using same device just placing a battery). Some have been having more problems than others. You can do a search on the FDA website with the model number and see how many adverse events are reported and what the issues were. These Medtronic reps are salesmen, not doctors and they have quotas. If you are interested in looking it up and need assistance let me know. It sounds like you had a good product in your previously. I like the devices that are a little older because you can view if they had problems unlike devices that are new to the marketplace.

I wish you good luck with your upcoming procedure.
I am not an attorney.Anything I write should not be considered legal advice.I am writing from my own personal experiences,which is not from any sort of legal background. You should consult with an attorney over legal issues. In California, if you cannot get an attorney you can consult with an I&A officer.
 
Reply
#5
Good morning peeps
First let me wish everyone on here a Merry Christmas and a healthy New Year
Janey and old peeps where are you all at these days and how is everyone doing with the comp and pain issues.
If you read my post here you will see that my spinal cord stimulator has came to an end of its life. The implanted battery is dead.
Since it died I was in the process of having to change my physican of record doctor, as my current dr. decided it was time for him to retire.
I now have a new dr. who wants to play around with my meds. Told them I would try what ever they recommend as I have dealt with changes for 15 years now. So I think we have found something that works, do not know what meds they may take away when I see them again next week. What ever happens I guess just happens.
Back to the spinal cord stimulator, mine is now dead in my body and needs to come out. This started 6 or 8 plus weeks ago. I have seen the surgeon who put it in my body 8 years ago. He has not summited the necessary paper work to comp and we now have an approval to go ahead with the surgery to replace it. Sometime after they first week of January 17, Me the dr and a rep from stimulator co, will meet in his office to see if the leads that are implanted in my body will work with the newest stimulator that is out on the market today. Hope it will work as he does not want to take the current leads out and replace as that is not and easy surgery to do. That day I will sign all the necessary papers for him to do the surgery. Then about 10 days later I will have the actual surgery. It is already scheduled at the hospital. Should only be in surgery for about 30 minutes he thinks. Will probably stay in hospital overnight. So I should be good for another 7 to 10 years with this replacement.
I hope everyone on here is doing well to the best they can with their injuries and workers comp issues and everyone is being care for medically and financially. I hope all has a Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year.
I hope I hear from the old peeps on here. Some of us have been reaching on here for a lot of years now, I would like to see where everyone has gone to these days.
Cervical Fusion 2003, c5-c6. Herniated and damaged Disc L1- L4-L5 S1. Lumbar Spinal Cord stimulator implant 09-2008. Cervical ACDF revision with hardware c4-c5-c6-c7 Sept 2009.
SSDI approved 3-2010. NOW OFFICIALY RETIRED
 
Reply
#6
C_F,
         Merry Christmas to you too...
         All is well on my end, under the most part pain is under control.. Just sometimes over doing things gets me but I know what my limits. I have been settled for a few years now, open medical which was great at first but there not covering my meds for the last few months.. Probably have to take them back before a judge again..  I hope all is well with everyone here and that used to be here..
.
 
Reply
#7
I wish you good luck with your surgery surgical_fusion. 

There have been some posters asking questions about spinal cord stimulators. I posted some pointers on how to keep yourself safe with medical device implants including spinal cord stimulators. I have learned a lot about this topic and attended a seminar in Washington DC with other patient advocates from all over the country on this issue and how devices are FDA approved, the medical device industry in general and how to protect patients from harm. I have been sharing some of this info on this site.

One thing I learned is the newest is not always the best when it comes to medical devices. In fact it is often times safer to use a older device that is proven to be safe and effective as most medical devices are not tested or have clinical trails. Most medical devices receive FDA approval by a process called 510(K). What this does is approve a device if the manufacturer states it is equivalent to another device already on the market. The FDA takes the manufacturers word on it. So basically they are being tested on the first patients who receive these devices and that is how they find out how well they work in a persons body. They do this to save money and avoid clinical trials. Studies have shown often times older devices work better and are safer. It can take a few years for problems to come up and adverse events reported.

 An example of medical devices that were more effective in the 70's verses now is hip implants. They were safer, lasted longer and worked better in the 70's than they do now. This doctor discusses the hip implant problem and why older medical devices often times work better than new ones.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0t_Kv3k70Y

There is a new search tool on the FDA website where you can do a search on any device. The regular search engine is also valuable because it will show adverse events reported. It is very important to look up the spinal cord stimulator your doctor wants to implant before he implants it because some of the newer devices have many reported problems. Often times doctors are not aware of this. I have a close friend who is also a doctor had some bad complications after he was implanted with his Medtronic spinl cord stim. I looked up his device and it was one of the models with hundreds of adverse events reported. Another member on this site had similar problems with their spinal cord stim and I did a FDA look up and their device was another one with way too many adverse events reported and she has since had to have it removed, but it caused some permanent damage.

http://www.fda.gov/

There can be reasons why a sales rep or doctor is using a particular device and it is not always in the best interest of the patient. Sales quotas, incentives and pushing a new device into the market are a few examples of why a device can be placed inside of a patient. There is a doctor look up tool called Dollars for Docs and you can look up your doctor to see if he receives monies from a particular device company and how much. One doctor I recently looked up for a patient received millions per year from one device manufacturer. Most are not that bad, however 85% of all physicians in the US take gifts from industry. This does not mean they are bad doctors, but those who are receiving large amounts, they may have ulterior motives for using one device over another.
https://projects.propublica.org/docdollars/

 Also, 20% of all surgeons in the US distribute the implants that they implant in their patients. This is called a POD (physician owned distributer). They are supposed to notify their patient of this, but many do not. California is the only state I know of so fat that no longer allows POD's in work comp as of 1/1/2012. We had a big problem with this.

 I write this to you so you will have the tools and resources (if you want them) to avoid a bad device. Many of these devices work well and provide patients with relief. Not all are bad, but some are really bad. You can ask your doctor or his rep for the model name and product code if you are interested in checking it out before it is implanted in you. It is your right. My goal is to help protect patients from harm through education.

I wanted to get your opinion on starting a post/string just for spinal cord stimulator topics/ questions as you have a lot of knowledge that can help others?Tbear also has knowledge on this issue that could help other patients.

I wish you the best of luck with your new implant. It sounds like the one you had previously worked well for you.
I am not an attorney.Anything I write should not be considered legal advice.I am writing from my own personal experiences,which is not from any sort of legal background. You should consult with an attorney over legal issues. In California, if you cannot get an attorney you can consult with an I&A officer.
 
Reply
#8
Merry Christmas!

I am one who will try to get by without pain meds if I can and sometime it backfires on me. I do use a tens unit and daily apply a Lidoderm pain patch, alieve in the daytime and if I have to perocet 10 at night.

2011 I had an ACDF of C5-6, I have been experiencing choking when eating. After seeing the neurosurgeon last week I learned the hardware is putting pressure on the esophagus. Not sure what the solution for this would be other than removal on the hardware which to neurosurgeon suggested.

One year ago I had shoulder surgery (left) with three of the four muscles torn, one completely torn off the bone and shredded. The shoulder was repaired using 4 anchors. Last week an MRI was done of the right shoulder which shows tears in two locations and thinning in the joint. I see the surgeon in January and will learn if this shoulder can be repaired or if a joint replacement is needed.

I try to stay active and do volunteer work 3- 4 half days a week,
 
Reply
#9
(12-23-2016, 10:22 PM)Bummer Knees Wrote: Merry Christmas!

I am one who will try to get by without pain meds if I can and sometime it backfires on me.  I do use a tens unit and daily apply a Lidoderm pain patch, alieve  in the daytime and if I have to perocet 10 at night.

2011 I had an ACDF of C5-6,  I have been experiencing choking when eating.  After seeing the neurosurgeon last week I learned the hardware is putting pressure on the esophagus.  Not sure what the solution for this would be other than removal on the hardware which to neurosurgeon suggested.

One year ago I had shoulder surgery (left)  with three of the four muscles torn, one completely torn off the bone and shredded.  The shoulder was repaired using 4 anchors.  Last week an MRI was done of the right shoulder which shows tears in two locations and thinning in the joint.  I see the surgeon in January and will learn if this shoulder can be repaired or if a joint replacement is needed.

I try to stay active and do volunteer work 3- 4 half days a week,

Can I ask you how long after your surgery in 2011 did you start to have the choking while eating problem? Also did your surgeon state what is exactly placing pressure on your esophagus, a screw  or a plate for example? There is a woman on the main forum who is having horrific problems after her cervical fusion including eating.
I am not an attorney.Anything I write should not be considered legal advice.I am writing from my own personal experiences,which is not from any sort of legal background. You should consult with an attorney over legal issues. In California, if you cannot get an attorney you can consult with an I&A officer.
 
Reply
#10
Sorry it took so long to respond CA.

The choking started the year of surgery but has gotten worse in 2016.

I had a barium swallow due to the issues with swallowing and it showed the pressure on the esophagus at the level of the fusion. I then had an MRI of the cervical spine and returned to the neurosurgeon who did my surgery. The surgeon reports while my fusion is stable the swallowing issue is from the hardware. He offered to remove the hardware but says often doing so will not make a difference.

Problems with swallowing is one of the risks of cervical spine surgery.
 
Reply
  


Forum Jump:


Browsing: 1 Guest(s)